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Hooked

02 Jan

Any writer that hasn’t read the book Hooked by Les Edgerton, really should. It’s a book that teaches how to write effective beginnings that draw readers in immediately, but it has a ton of insight into plotting the rest of the book if you’re looking for it.

One of the parts I found most helpful was his explaination of the difference between story-worthy problems and surface problems. The story-worthy problem is what changes the protagonists world and is deeply psychological while the surface problems are the series of events he’ll go through to reveal the SWP.

Relating this to my own story, I realized that I didn’t have a SWP. My characters went through a series of surface problems but there was no deep psychological change in them. Heavens above, how do I fix that? A whole lot of brainstorming, that’s how.

Basically, I’ve gone back to the beginning. I’ve been outlining and character sketching, plotting and scheming, cutting and pasting. And I think it’s going to pay off. I can’t wait to get my next round of readers to see what they think of this new version. I hope they’re hooked.

Happy Writing!

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3 Comments

Posted by on 2010/01/02 in Books, Writing

 

3 responses to “Hooked

  1. Koreen

    2010/01/02 at 11:45

    That’s great that you’ve found Les’s book. I had the opportunity to take a class with him a few month ago, and his ideas really helped me focus the beginning of my novel. The idea of the SWP also helped with the outline of the second one. This time it’s easier (and harder) when I know that the characters should evolve in some way. It’s something we should probably add to our forum critique questions on TNBW. Good luck with the rewrites.

     
    • Candice Beever

      2010/01/02 at 12:30

      It was an awesome book. Thanks for recommending it to me. I’m just sorry it took me so long to read it. I bet that class with him was pretty awesome.

      Thanks for the well-wishes. I’m gonna need them.

       
  2. Corra McFeydon

    2010/01/02 at 18:06

    Sounds fascinating! Thanks for sharing what you learned. 🙂

     

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